EFE—Student Wellness

Emery County School District

Policy: EFE—Student Wellness

Date Adopted: 5 April 2006

Current Review / Revision: 3 May 2017


Purpose

The Emery School District recognizes that students need adequate, nourishing food in order to grow, learn and maintain good health. The Emery School District Board of Education recognizes that research links a direct and positive correlation between adequate nutrition, physical activity, and academic success. The Utah State Core Curriculum has objectives to implement physical fitness and healthy lifestyles at every grade level. Emery School District Board of Education supports the principles of proper nutrition and establishes the following polity, which complies with the national standards as set by its final ruling on July 21, 2016 by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Definitions

  1. “School Day” means the period from midnight before the start of school to 30 minutes after the end of the

    official school day.

  2. “School Campus” means all areas of school property which are accessible to students during the school day.

  3. “Available for Sale” means any item that may be exchanged for currency in any form, i.e. money, tokens, tickets, etc.

  4. “Competitive Food” means all food and beverages available for sale to students on the school campus during the school day except for meals reimbursed under the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program.

Required Nutritional Standards

The District Child Nutrition Program shall continue to plan and prepare meals and snacks that comply with current USDA standards with an emphasis on fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and dairy foods that are low in fat, added sugars, and sodium.

All competitive food, as defined above, must meet the USDA nutrition standards unless such foods fall within one of the exemptions below. A summary of the competitive food nutrition standards is available at the district office and all school kitchens.

Vending Machines

The District recognizes the monetary benefit that vending machines give to schools. Each school that elects to have vending machines on campus shall monitor said machines to ensure that items sold meet the Smart Snacks in Schools standards. Vending machines will not be made available to students in elementary schools. Vending machines in middle and high schools will not be made available while breakfast and lunch are being served.

Each school that chooses to use vending machines shall have a Board approved, written policy that complies with R277-719-3 (Standards for Selling Foods Outside of the Reimbursable Meal in Schools) which also outlines any vendor agreements/contracts, how and when monies will be accounted and deposited, and nutritional standards of items sold.

Exemptions from Standards

The following are exempt from compliance with the competitive food nutrition standards:

  1. Any entrée item which is offered as part of the school lunch or school breakfast program, when offered as competitive food on the same day, or on the following day, that it was also offered as part of the school lunch or school breakfast program. Such competitive offerings must be in the same or smaller portion sizes as the lunch or breakfast program offerings. However, side dishes offered as part of the lunch or breakfast program and served a’ la carte must meet the competitive food nutrition standards.

  2. Sugar-free chewing gum

  3. Specially exempted fundraisers. Competitive food may be sold as part of an infrequent fundraiser sponsored by the school. The allowed number of such exempted fundraisers will be established by the State Board of Education. If no limit has been established by the State Board of Education, no exempted fundraisers are permitted. Any competitive food sold as part of a fundraiser which is not exempted must meet the competitive food nutrition standards.

Food and Beverages Not Subject to Regulations

The Smart Snacks in Schools regulations apply to food and beverages sold to students on the school campus during the school day. The following are not within the scope of this regulation and are not required to meet the competitive food nutrition standards:

  1. Food and beverages which are not sold. This includes food or beverages which are brought to school by students such as home lunches. It also includes food or beverages which are given to students without the exchange of any currency, tokens, or tickets, for example, commercially prepared snacks or treats given out in connection with a birthday celebration.

  2. Food and beverages sold after the school day. This includes food and beverages sold during the time period beginning 30 minutes after the end of the official school day until midnight, for example, concessions sold at an athletic event.

  3. Food and beverages not sold on school campus. The campus is defined as all areas which are accessible to students. Food or beverages sold in areas which are not accessible to students, for example, the teacher’s lounge, are not required to meet the nutrition standards.

  4. Food and beverages not sold to students. Food or beverages sold to persons other than students, for example, parents and staff, are not required to meet the nutrition standards.

  5. Teachers are encouraged by the Board to find alternative incentives to food and candy as rewards or incentives for learning or behavior goals. Food as part of teaching/learning experiences should be used on a limited basis.

  6. The Board encourages elementary schools to limit birthday celebrations involving food to one time each month on a chosen day. All food or drink brought to the school, other than home lunches, shall be commercially prepared. Details will be worked out on a school basis with school principals.